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Pathways for Youth Training

Mental Health America of Hawaii News Release

In 2011, Hawaii’s youth ranked second highest in the nation for high school students who have made a suicide plan, and highest in the nation for middle school students who have made a suicide plan.  Native Hawaiians are at higher risk than other students. As a community, what can we do to better understand the risks facing these youth? And, more importantly, what are our resources?

On Tuesday, Nov. 13, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., training on Molokai for service providers for parents and community members who care about the youth of Molokai is being hosted by the Molokai Community Health Center (MCHC). The free program, called Pathways for Youth, is brought to the island by Mental Health America of Hawaii’s Stop Youth Suicide and Bullying Project, in partnership with MCHC, the Consuelo Foundation, UH Manoa, and Uncle Wayde Lee. Its goal is to raise awareness about violence prevention on Molokai.

Three different presenters will offer their expertise. Lee is a local expert in Juvenile Justice and Native Hawaiian youth health, chair of the Juvenile Justice State Advisory Council, and substance abuse trainer who has conducted numerous trainings, workshops and sessions through Alu Like and Hui Ho`okupono program. Carol Plummer is an Associate Professor at the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work (UH Manoa) and a Research Affiliate with the Consuelo Foundation, who recently completed a statewide Hawaii research study entitled, “And How Are the Children” and is focusing program development and research work on the island of Molokai. Antonia Alvarez is the director of the Stop Youth Suicide and Bullying Project at Mental Health America of Hawaii, who has conducted more than 250 trainings statewide for more than 6,000 youth and 4,500 adults in four years.

Throughout the day, presenters will explore the many pathways to risk that face our youth, including mental health, sexual identity, child abuse and neglect, economic challenges, bullying, suicide, dating violence, substance abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing violence. We will identify the various levels of risk that these youth encounter and also present interventions, prevention strategies, and methods of support. Emphasizing the power of community connectedness, multiple lines of support, and resilience, participants will walk away with a greater sense of awareness, action, and hope.

Please RSVP to Stephani Napoli at MCHC, 553-5038, or email snapoli@molokaichc.org.

Additionally, on Monday, Nov. 12 we will be hosting an `Ohana talk-story from 5 to 8 p.m. (location TBA). Please contact Antonia Alvarez, antonia@mentalhealth-hi.org, for additional information.

Pathways for YouthMental Health America of Hawaii News Release In 2011, Hawaii’s youth ranked second highest in the nation for high school students who have made a suicide plan, and highest in the nation for middle school students who have made a suicide plan.  Native Hawaiians are at higher risk than other students. As a community, what can we do to better understand the risks facing these youth? And, more importantly, what are our resources?On Tuesday, Nov. 13, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., training on Molokai for service providers for parents and community members who care about the youth of Molokai is being hosted by the Molokai Community Health Center (MCHC). The free program, called Pathways for Youth, is brought to the island by Mental Health America of Hawaii’s Stop Youth Suicide and Bullying Project, in partnership with MCHC, the Consuelo Foundation, UH Manoa, and Uncle Wayde Lee. Its goal is to raise awareness about violence prevention on Molokai.Three different presenters will offer their expertise. Lee is a local expert in Juvenile Justice and Native Hawaiian youth health, chair of the Juvenile Justice State Advisory Council, and substance abuse trainer who has conducted numerous trainings, workshops and sessions through Alu Like and Hui Ho`okupono program. Carol Plummer is an Associate Professor at the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work (UH Manoa) and a Research Affiliate with the Consuelo Foundation, who recently completed a statewide Hawaii research study entitled, “And How Are the Children” and is focusing program development and research work on the island of Molokai. Antonia Alvarez is the director of the Stop Youth Suicide and Bullying Project at Mental Health America of Hawaii, who has conducted more than 250 trainings statewide for more than 6,000 youth and 4,500 adults in four years.Throughout the day, presenters will explore the many pathways to risk that face our youth, including mental health, sexual identity, child abuse and neglect, economic challenges, bullying, suicide, dating violence, substance abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing violence. We will identify the various levels of risk that these youth encounter and also present interventions, prevention strategies, and methods of support. Emphasizing the power of community connectedness, multiple lines of support, and resilience, participants will walk away with a greater sense of awareness, action, and hope. Please RSVP to Stephani Napoli at MCHC, 553-5038, or email snapoli@molokaichc.org.Additionally, on Monday, Nov. 12 we will be hosting an `Ohana talk-story from 5 to 8 p.m. (location TBA). Please contact Antonia Alvarez, antonia@mentalhealth-hi.org, for additional information.

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