Hunting & Fishing

CBSFA Follows ‘Ike Kupuna

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

Opinion by Keani Rawlins-Fernandez

The highly anticipated Board of Land and Natural Resources public hearing on the Mo‘omomi CBSFA will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 19 at 5:30pm. Due to COVID-19, the hearing will be livestreamed. Testimony may be provided online or in-person with advanced registration.

What is a CBSFA? A Community-Based Subsistence Fishing Area designation is a type of fishing management area that encourages continued subsistence, and in Mo‘omomi’s case, would prohibit commercial fishing, except for trolling, within its boundaries. CBSFAs are not marine sanctuaries. It would not create “no-take zones,” like Hanauma Bay.

The Mo‘omomi CBSFA would not limit or prohibit anyone’s right to gather and feed their families: “§13-60.9-1(3) Recognize and protect customary and traditional native Hawaiian fishing practices that are exercised for subsistence, cultural, and religious purposes in the area.…

Mo’omomi CBSFA Public Hearing

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

DLNR News Release

Stakeholders are strongly encouraged to participate online for a statewide, online public hearing on the proposed adoption of new rules to establish the Moʻomomi Community-Based Subsistence Fishing Area (CBSFA) on Molokai’s northwestern coast. The goal of the CBSFA is to establish a marine managed area to maintain sustainable long-term harvest of key subsistence fish stocks and to reaffirm traditional and customary native Hawaiian subsistence fishing practices.

Brian Neilson, Administrator of the DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) said, “This innovative option of an online hearing, especially with the spike in coronavirus infections, provides a safe and appropriate physical distancing for DLNR/DAR to hear from everyone regarding these important nearshore marine resources.…

Hunting or Killing?

Thursday, May 21st, 2020

Definitions of hunting can include the activity of pursuing wild game for sport and food harvest. I grew up in a hunting family. For me, hunting is filled with anticipation, excitement and challenge, plus the possibility of eating the best healthiest meat on Earth. Hunting, for me, is not only about the harvest. I also enjoy observing wildlife in their natural habitat. My son and I have often sat together for hours watching deer, goats or pigs enjoying life in their natural environment.

The harvest of wild game is often a way of life and subsistence for many local Molokai residents.…

Taking Aim at Molokai Archery Tournament

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018

Taking Aim at Molokai Archery Tournament

 

Molokai Bowhunters Archery Club hit its mark last Saturday as members hosted their 20th annual state tournament at the Kalae Bow Range. The event attracts more than 50 shooters from around the state and mainland each year.

The range consists of more than 10 acres of wooded, hilly terrain, with trails leading to marked targets of varying distances. Shooters compete in a variety of categories based on their bow type, such as freestyle, traditional or bowhunter. It’s an activity for all ages — one of the day’s youngest shooters was 4 years old, while the master seniors category featured archers age 70 and up.…

Two More Monk Seals Dead

Wednesday, August 1st, 2018

 

The deaths of two young male Hawaiian monk seals on Molokai in June are being investigated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This comes after a young female was killed at Mo’omomi in May, with injuries showing human-inflicted trauma as the cause of her death. 

An unidentified juvenile male was found dead at  Paka’a beach on Molokai’s west end on June 25. The other young male, identified as RJ26, was born at Kalaupapa last year and found dead on June 18 on the east end near mile marker 22. NOAA’s Jolene Lau said no other details could be released at this time, pending the investigation.…

Drawing a Seabird Map

Wednesday, July 11th, 2018

Drawing a Seabird Map

 

Molokai’s high elevation forests are full of secrets, surprises and rare, native species. Thought to be extinct on Molokai until recently, the endangered Newell’s shearwater, or ‘A’o, is a seabird that may also nest deep in the shelter of Molokai’s forest.

Right now, though, no one knows for sure.

Molokai is home to many native and endangered seabird species but biologists aren’t sure how many or where many of them are nesting. A new mapping project seeks to shed light on the state’s seabird population and represents the first comprehensive survey of Hawaii seabirds to date. Anticipated to last three years, the project is kicking off on Molokai this summer.…

Monk Seal Killed at Mo’omomi

Wednesday, June 20th, 2018

Monk Seal Killed at Mo’omomi

Last month, a young female Hawaiian monk seal was killed at Kawa’aloa Bay at  Mo’omomi, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The yearling seal, identified as RJ42, was found dead by community members on May 31. An investigation is underway so details of the cause of death cannot be released, but a post-mortem examination conducted by NOAA on June 1 indicated it was an intentional act.

“[The] injuries were purposely inflicted by a person(s) that caused a significant amount of trauma resulting in the monk seal’s death,” a NOAA statement said.

This is the sixth suspected monk seal killing on Molokai, and third at Mo’omomi, since 2009, according to NOAA.…

Emergency Device Helps Rescue Fishermen

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

 

Last Thursday, two Molokai fishermen were stranded after their 18-foot boat capsized. A Coast Guard crew was able to quickly locate them and hoist them to safety after the fishermen activated an emergency beacon on board their vessel called an EPIRB, which stands for emergency position-indicating radiobeacon.

The two men, who were not identified, launched their boat from Kaunakakai Harbor Thursday morning to go fishing. They reported that a wave hit their boat, overturning it. They were able to swim out from under the boat but weren’t able to call for help, according to the Coast Guard. One of the Molokai residents swam back under the boat to manually activate the emergency beacon, and the signal was received by the Coast Guard at 12:06 p.m.…

Mixed Feedback for Proposed Subsistence Fishing Area

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

Mixed Feedback for Proposed Subsistence Fishing Area

Emotions ran high during a contentious discussion about the Community Based Subsistence Fishing Area (CBSFA) being proposed for a portion of Molokai’s norther coastline last Thursday. Organizers of the proposal say efforts began about 20 years ago to establish sustainable fishing guidelines to protect declining ocean species. Now, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is beginning a process to create an official designation for the area and gathering feedback on the proposed rules that reflect traditional fishing practices of moderate gathering and kapu periods.

While some feel the rules are needed to ensure Molokai’s resources are protected for the future, others expressed concerns that they didn’t feel involved in the process or that the rules will limit Hawaiian gathering rights.…

FAQ on Subsistence Fishing Area

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

 

By Bruce S. Anderson, DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources Administrator

With the recent submission of a Community-Based Subsistence Fishing Area (CBSFA) designation proposal for Mo`omomi and the North Coast of Molokai, and upcoming public scoping meetings, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) would like to address some frequently asked questions. The proposed CBSFA extends from `Ilio Point in the west to Kaholaiki Bay in the east, from the shoreline out to one nautical mile.

What is a CBSFA?
A CBSFA is a type of marine managed area established by State law for the specific purpose of “reaffirming and protecting fishing practices customarily and traditionally exercised for purposes of native Hawaiian subsistence, culture, and religion.”…