Sustainability

Maximum Protection, Minimal Change at Papohaku

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Maximum Protection, Minimal Change at Papohaku

 

Papohaku sand dunes protect the water from runoff and nearby homes from high tide swells. Now the system that guards so much could receive some protection from human threats. The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) proposed increased protection for the Papohaku dune system. While the changes will not likely bring enforcement of stricter development rules, officials said they hope the protection would raise awareness of the dunes’ value.

A 500-page document dedicated solely to the preservation of the dune system at Papohaku stresses the environmental and cultural value of the system. Molokai wildlife biologist Arleone Dibben-Young, who served as a consultant for the preservation plan, said these dunes shelter homes from high swells and shield the ocean from red dirt run-off that comes with rain from the mauka regions.…

Big Funds for Organizations Making a Big Difference

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Big Funds for Organizations Making a Big Difference

 

Two Molokai nonprofit organizations have support to “pay it forward” in the community using awards from the Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA). Ka Honua Momona (KHM) and Kukui Ahi Patient Program at Molokai General Hospital each received $10,000 from HMSA as part of the health care coverage provider’s 75th anniversary celebration.

HMSA employees chose 10 organizations statewide to receive $10,000 each to make a difference in their communities, according to a press release about the HMSA Pays It Forward campaign.

“Our employees wanted to find a way to really stretch this gift and I’m confident this concept of paying it forward will accomplish that,” said HMSA CEO Michael Gold.…

An Evening for the Earth

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

An Evening for the Earth

The community gathered at Mitchel Pauole Center Friday to explore Molokai’s natural wonders and celebrate the gifts of the `aina.  With information on conservation, plant life, wildfire prevention, clean energy and more, Molokai Earth Day featured an abundance of learning for keiki and adults. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has organized the annual event since 1995, and this year the organization recognized its 30th year on Molokai.

Kula Kaiapuni o Kualapu`u (pictured here), Kualapu`u Charter School’s Hawaiian Language immersion program, kicked off the night, which included music, prizes and food.  TNC Molokai program manager Ed Misaki received the Malama Kuleana Honua Conservation Award for his 30 years of conservation through TNC, including Kamakou Preserve and the East Molokai Watershed Partnership.…

Tradition of Adaptive Management

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

Community Contributed

By Aha Kiole O Molokai

When it comes to the land and ocean, we are aware that laws have been created and maintained by the State of Hawaii, with the intent to help regulate the usage and continuity of the resources. It has become evident that the management system long-used in Hawaii has not served to keep Hawaii’s resources healthy and abundant. One of the key differences between our current state practices and traditional Hawaiian resource practices — and why the system of the past worked — is that each island and moku division based their management decisions on the environmental conditions of their own areas.…

Managing the North Shore

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Traditional fishing practices along Molokai’s north shore could soon be supported by law if a new proposal is approved by the state.

The Mo`omomi area, which provides food for Ho`olehua homesteaders through its ocean resources, is closer to receiving official state designation as a community-based subsistence fishing area (CBSFA). Conservation group Hui Malama O Mo`omomi organized the official proposal for the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR)  and has presented it at a series of meetings with fishermen, homesteaders and the public. After the group has allowed time to receive public comments and questions, they will present it to the DLNR at a public hearing.…

Feeding Molokai Sustainably

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

Feeding Molokai Sustainably

Molokai used to be known as “Molokai `Aina Momona,” or the abundant land, for its plentiful food supply that fed a population many times its current size. Like much of the state, Molokai now imports most of the food found in its stores and restaurants — 98 percent, in fact.

But the food served on Molokai’s dinner tables is a different story. About 40 percent of food consumed comes from subsistence sources such as hunting, fishing, gathering and home grown fruits and vegetables, according to a 2012 study conducted by Sust `aina ble Molokai.

“[The high level of subsistence] means that if disaster hits, Molokai is actually better off than other islands even though food production is less [than other islands],” said Emillia Noordhoek, executive director of Sust `aina ble Molokai.…

Public Shoreline Management Meeting Friday

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Public Shoreline Management Meeting Friday

Community Contributed By Walter Ritte

On Friday March 29, Good Friday, an important meeting is being called by the Pala`au Moku of the Aha Kiole O Molokai. A “Shoreline Management Plan” from Ilio Point to Pelekunu on the north shore of Molokai will be presented.

The plan gives management powers of the shoreline resources to the community. Rules are needed in order to preserve the resources so our children and their children will be able to have free fish, limu, opihi, he`e, lobster, crabs, etc.

Come and learn, and share your mana’o and help manage the Ho`olehua icebox. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m.…

GMO March Saturday

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Moms on a Mission – Molokai News Release

Every Saturday during the month of March, thousands of individuals across Hawaii, have been marching to express their love for the land, the ocean, and their desire to protect them from genetically modified organisms (GMO) chemical testing and farming. Participants have included families with their children, local farmers, and advocates for food safety. Marches have already been held in Hale`iwa, Oahu (March 2), Kauai (March 9), Hawaii Island (March 16), and Maui (March 23) and the final march will take place here on Molokai on Saturday, March 30.

Supported by Hawaii SEED, Moms on a Mission – Molokai, Hawaii GMO Justice Coalition, and Aloha `Aina, the Molokai march will focus on moving forward for a safer and healthier today and tomorrow for our keiki.…

Farming in the Shade

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Farming in the Shade

Along Hua`ai Road in Ho`olehua, there’s a wooded area grown over with weeds and bushes. This area is disguised as a simple, unkempt forest, but within it lays a flourishing garden of fruits and vegetables, all growing in the shade.

Molokai resident Joe Kennedy is the man behind the food forest. He began planting crops there last March, and a year later he has healthy, productive plants that use each other for support and protection. Avocado, taro and spinach are just a few of Kennedy’s crops. He founded the forest based on the idea of permaculture, a conservation theory that reflects his own love for the earth and a desire to preserve the land for future generations.…

Mateo’s Mana`o

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

Mateo’s Mana`o

 

Danny Mateo’s time as Maui County council chair ended at noon Jan. 2. The next minute he started his work in the Mayor’s office as an executive assistant and liaison for the county and State legislature.

“Retirement for me is not in the immediate future,” he said over coffee at Kanemitsu Bakery Saturday. “I still have a lot to offer. As long as there is fire in the fireplace I will continue what I do.”

This means Mateo will continue to be a voice for the people of Molokai and work to improve the island, something he did for 10 years as a councilmember before he reached his term limit.  …