Environment

News stories regarding Molokai’s outdoor environment

Season’s First Pup

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Season’s First Pup

Photo by Sly Lee, Marine Bio.Tech, National Parks Service, Kalaupapa

This black-coated baby is the first Hawaiian monk seal of the season born on Papaloa Beach, Kalaupapa last week.  Researchers don’t yet know whether it’s a boy or a girl. The mother, named RV06 by scientists, was also born in Kalaupapa in 2005, said Diane Pike, Molokai response coordinator for the Monk Seal Foundation.

Last year, RV06’s pup died after three days, but so far this year, mother and pup seem to be doing fine, Pike said.

Hawaiian monk seals are highly endangered, with only about 1,100 individuals alive today. Scientists believe the Hawaiian monk seal, along with the Hoary Bat, are the only two species of mammals indigenous to the Hawaiian Islands.…

Man Camp Called Off

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

When California resident Bryce Anderson visited Molokai in February, he thought it was the perfect place to get away from the city.

Anderson runs a company called Man Skills Academy (MANSA), a San Francisco-based organization built on developing men’s real-life skills and social relatability that Anderson feels are lost to technology. Wanting to hold a back-to-the-basics nature retreat for MANSA, Anderson created Man Camp Molokai and began promoting the island and the event to group members.

“Are you ready for the adventure of a lifetime on the coolest island in the entire world??!” he posted on the social planning site meetup.com.…

Molokai Wildfire Protection Plan

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization News Release

The Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization, in collaboration with the Molokai Fire Task Force, will hold community input meetings to help develop a Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) for Molokai.  The meeting will be held on Wednesday, March 18 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Kulana `Oiwi.

Wildfires have great impacts on Molokai residents and natural resources, affecting daily life like road closures, evacuations, post-fire flooding and tax payer dollars. Fires affect human health and safety, such as creating dust and smoke, impacting water quality and resident and firefighter safety. They also affect the ecosystem including watersheds, forests, coral reefs and fisheries.…

Agroforestry Workshop

Friday, March 13th, 2015

UH CTAHR News Release

What is Agroforestry? Combining agriculture and forestry is nothing new, and has been practiced for centuries by the ancients, who practiced growing plants vital to their survival in forests while also enhancing what was already there. The Hawaiian garden is one example, with trees and plants that serve our food, fiber, medicinal, cultural, and construction needs in a sustainable system that continues to feed itself, including us.

March 21 is the first day of spring, and what better way to celebrate this special day than to learn about agroforestry concepts and applications on Molokai. Speakers include Craig Elevitch, Alton Arakaki, Fred Richardson, and another off-island speaker.…

Become a FoodCorps Member

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

Sust`aina ble Molokai News Release

FoodCorps is currently recruiting service members throughout Hawaii who are passionate about teaching children what healthy food is, where it comes from, and expanding hands-on nutrition education programs. This includes Sust`aina ble Molokai, which is recruiting for new service members to serve on Molokai at our island schools.  The deadline to apply for the 2015–2016 school year is March 31.

FoodCorps is a national organization addressing childhood obesity and food insecurity in underserved communities, and currently operates in 16 states and the District of Columbia. Through its partnership with AmeriCorps, FoodCorps recruits, trains, and places emerging leaders, known as service members, into limited-resource communities for a year of service.…

Proposed Solar Program Changes

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

Proposed Solar Program Changes

Molokai has the highest percentage of renewable energy compared to total electric usage of any island at 51 percent, according to Maui Electric Company (MECO). With that high percentage, however, comes challenges for the island’s small electric grid – as well as unfair prices for customers without solar, claims MECO. The company is proposing changes that would temporarily halt the installation of rooftop solar on Molokai – and many customers and local solar companies aren’t happy about it.

In a program called Net Metering Program (NEM), customers with solar photovoltaic (PV) panels are paid by the utility company for excess energy the panels generate at retail rate.…

Understanding Soils Workshop

Friday, February 20th, 2015

UH CTAHR release

Hawaii has more than 140 different soil types, the most diverse of anywhere on the planet. Each soil is managed differently and responds to different nutrients and amendments. The formation of soil is influenced by temperature, rainfall, slope, and also age and content of the parent material from which the soil is formed. Volcanic eruptions are all unique in what types of soil it will create over time, some very rich in nutrients and others devoid of key nutrients. Having this knowledge your unique soil will help farmer and gardener better manage their soil for optimal growth of food, utility and ornamental plants.…

Hula Girl’s Flower

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Hula Girl’s Flower

Community Contributed

By Glenn I. Teves, UH CTAHR County Extension Agent

The local tradition of lei giving and receiving are an important part of local celebrations, especially May Day and graduation celebrations, bedecked with leis of all colors, shapes, and fragrances. Lei flowers, especially plumeria and its alluring fragrance remind us of bygone days, of growing up, and of special events in our lives. Plumeria is also an old favorite of hula dancers.

Plumeria, also known as Frangipani and pua melia, is native to Tropical America, and include two main species, Plumeria obtusa and acuminata that will cross to produce an array of colors, including white, yellow, pink, and red.…

Molokai Food Hub in Operation

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Sust`aina ble Molokai News Release

Sust`aina ble Molokai’s newly launched Molokai Food Hub is seeking locally grown fruits and vegetables.  In January, we officially became the vendor for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) for Maunaloa Elementary School.  This is a federally funded snack program, which allows students to receive a snack of a fresh fruit or vegetable two to three times per week.  As the vendor, we are aiming to provide as much Molokai-grown fruit and vegetables as possible, so please call or email us if you would like to be a supplier (560-5410 or harmonee@sustainablemolokai.org).

The program is open to growers who can provide 60 servings of fresh fruit or vegetable (minimum serving size of 1/2 cup), and they will be paid fair market value. …

Controlled Burn Clears Hazardous Brush

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

The Maui Fire Department (MFD) conducted its first Molokai-based controlled burn last week, clearing out 50 acres of overgrown brush behind residents’ homes in Kalama`ula between Feb. 4 and 7.

Nearly 40 firefighters from Molokai, Maui, Hawaii Island and the Pacific Northwest participated in the exercise, which, besides decreasing the potential for wildfire, also provided live training for firefighters.

“It’s a good area to mitigate hazards,” said Kaunakakai Fire Captain Henry Lindo, explaining that fires in that area tend to spread quickly, pushed forward by winds.

Maui County’s first controlled burn took place in December 2013 in West Maui, and other islands have conducted controlled burns before, but this is Molokai’s first.…