Hunting & Fishing

Hale Connects People to Land and Sea

Monday, May 27th, 2013

Hale Connects People to Land and Sea

At Ka Honua Momona (KHM) Ali`i fishpond, workers take breaks in the shade of a large traditional thatched hale, where it is cool even on the hottest days. Office workers can look out at the hale and 30-acre pond from the windows of the sustainable office building where administrative work supports KHM’s mission of sustainability.

KHM hasn’t always had these amenities. The office and hale are the newest addition to the Ali`i fishpond, which nine years ago was overgrown with mangrove and knee-deep in mud. Today, because of the efforts of staff and volunteers eager to preserve the site’s ancient heritage, the Ali`i and Kalakoeli fishponds serve as a place for learning, sharing and restoring.…

Maximum Protection, Minimal Change at Papohaku

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Maximum Protection, Minimal Change at Papohaku

 

Papohaku sand dunes protect the water from runoff and nearby homes from high tide swells. Now the system that guards so much could receive some protection from human threats. The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) proposed increased protection for the Papohaku dune system. While the changes will not likely bring enforcement of stricter development rules, officials said they hope the protection would raise awareness of the dunes’ value.

Red dirt flows into the ocean where dunes were demolished on the west end of Molokai.
Photo contributed by Arleone Dibben-Young

A 500-page document dedicated solely to the preservation of the dune system at Papohaku stresses the environmental and cultural value of the system.…

Changes to Wildlife Rules

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Changes to Wildlife Rules

Hawaii’s Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is working to protect watersheds, native species and agriculture with proposed amendments to their administrative rules. The rule changes aim to prohibit the transport and release of introduced invasive wildlife, including mongoose, ants, snakes and ungulates, said Laura Goodmiller of DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife.

“Introduced species negatively affect Hawaii’s environment in a variety of ways, including predation and competition to indigenous species, damage to watersheds, the spread of pathogens and diseases, and threats to agriculture,” she said.

Under the proposed rule changes, transport and release of axis deer will be illegal.…

Tradition of Adaptive Management

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

Community Contributed

By Aha Kiole O Molokai

When it comes to the land and ocean, we are aware that laws have been created and maintained by the State of Hawaii, with the intent to help regulate the usage and continuity of the resources. It has become evident that the management system long-used in Hawaii has not served to keep Hawaii’s resources healthy and abundant. One of the key differences between our current state practices and traditional Hawaiian resource practices — and why the system of the past worked — is that each island and moku division based their management decisions on the environmental conditions of their own areas.…

Managing the North Shore

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Traditional fishing practices along Molokai’s north shore could soon be supported by law if a new proposal is approved by the state.

The Mo`omomi area, which provides food for Ho`olehua homesteaders through its ocean resources, is closer to receiving official state designation as a community-based subsistence fishing area (CBSFA). Conservation group Hui Malama O Mo`omomi organized the official proposal for the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR)  and has presented it at a series of meetings with fishermen, homesteaders and the public. After the group has allowed time to receive public comments and questions, they will present it to the DLNR at a public hearing.…

Feeding Molokai Sustainably

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

Feeding Molokai Sustainably

Molokai used to be known as “Molokai `Aina Momona,” or the abundant land, for its plentiful food supply that fed a population many times its current size. Like much of the state, Molokai now imports most of the food found in its stores and restaurants — 98 percent, in fact.

But the food served on Molokai’s dinner tables is a different story. About 40 percent of food consumed comes from subsistence sources such as hunting, fishing, gathering and home grown fruits and vegetables, according to a 2012 study conducted by Sust `aina ble Molokai.

“[The high level of subsistence] means that if disaster hits, Molokai is actually better off than other islands even though food production is less [than other islands],” said Emillia Noordhoek, executive director of Sust `aina ble Molokai.…

Tonight’s DLNR Meeting on Wildlife Rule Amendment

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

 

DLNR News Release

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) will host a public hearing tonight to receive testimony on proposed amendments to Hawaii Administrative Rules, Title 13, Subtitle 5, Part 2, Chapter 124, “Indigenous Wildlife, Endangered and Threatened Wildlife, and Introduced Wild Birds.”

The primary purpose of the proposed amendments is to prohibit and deter the transport and release of introduced wildlife. Introduced species can impact Hawaii’s ecosystems and economy by introducing harmful predation and competition to indigenous species, damaging watersheds, spreading pathogens and diseases, and harming agriculture.

“The movement of live, introduced wildlife poses direct threats to our native ecosystems, and the proposed amendments will help prevent harm to our natural resources and economy,” said William J.…

Public Shoreline Management Meeting Friday

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Public Shoreline Management Meeting Friday

Community Contributed By Walter Ritte

On Friday March 29, Good Friday, an important meeting is being called by the Pala`au Moku of the Aha Kiole O Molokai. A “Shoreline Management Plan” from Ilio Point to Pelekunu on the north shore of Molokai will be presented.

Marchers, including a group of Molokai residents, gathered in Hilo for “March in March” on March 16.

The plan gives management powers of the shoreline resources to the community. Rules are needed in order to preserve the resources so our children and their children will be able to have free fish, limu, opihi, he`e, lobster, crabs, etc.…

NOAA Proposal Aims to Save Coral

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

NOAA Proposal Aims to Save Coral

The south shore of Molokai boasts one of the largest fringing coral reefs in Hawaii, providing a home for fish, a draw for tourism, shelter from ocean storms, and sustenance for the local economy. Coral is fragile, though, and biologists fear these valuable organisms could be extinct by the year 2100. This is why the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) proposed to list 66 species of coral as endangered or threatened, an action that could protect the island’s reef.

Of the 66 species that NOAA may soon list as threatened or endangered, three exist in Hawaii, and two – montipora patula and montipora flabellata– call the Molokai area home.…

Fish and Dive Refreshes Business

Sunday, February 3rd, 2013

Fish and Dive Refreshes Business

 

After 40 years in the same location, Molokai Fish and Dive is being moved into the gas station next door in a process that will bring several changes to the popular ocean gear and tour provider. Tim and Susan Forsberg, who have owned the shop for 12 years, said it was time to do something different, so they took on the challenge of adding fuel and food to their services for locals and tourists.

When the Forsbergs noticed Hayaku, the gas station next door, was often closed last December, they feared that Molokai would soon have only one gas station again.…