Hawaiian Culture

Hawaiian culture stories from Molokai

Honoring Hawaii’s First Homestead

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Honoring Hawaii’s First Homestead

Beginning in 1921, a selected group of hardy Hawaiian families began building a life in Kalama`ula. They cleared kiawe, constructed homes and infrastructure, planted gardens and raised livestock. It was difficult work, but because of their success, more than 6,000 Hawaiian Homesteaders now live around the state, according to OHA Chairperson Colette Machado.

“They had to make do and… they overcame that and succeeded,” said Machado. “If it wasn’t for the Kalama`ula demonstration, [Native Hawaiians] wouldn’t be where we are today.”

Last week, the descendants of Hawaii’s first 42 homesteaders in Kalama`ula gathered to celebrate 90 years since the establishment of the Kalaniana`ole Settlement, as it was known.…

Aka`ula School Celebrates 10 Years

Friday, April 25th, 2014

Aka`ula School Celebrates 10 Years

Editor’s note: Reprinted here with permission are two student-written articles that originally appeared in Aka`ula School’s newsletter.

By Madison Trenner, grade 5

On Saturday, April 5, Aka`ula School celebrated a decade of “Learning and Leading Together.”  On this beautiful spring day current students opened with the school oli.  Victoria Newberry presented a colorful history of how a group of energetic people came together and started a school.  Towards the end of her speech, we were blessed with a short shower.  Lunch was a plate of tasty tortillas filled with meat and vegetables.  For dessert we had the biggest cake I have ever seen. …

Advocating for the `Aina

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Advocating for the `Aina

In celebration of Earth Day, hundreds of attendees, young and old, examined taxidermies of the endangered native Hawaiian duck, learned how to check plants for invasive fire ants using peanut butter, and pinpointed areas of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, the most remote island archipelago in the world.

The community gathered at Molokai’s 22nd annual Earth Day festival at the Kaunakakai Ball Field last Friday evening to honor the values of aloha `aina and malama `aina. Kupuna Moses “Moke” Kim inspired island youth to malama `aina through the Hana Kupono program at Molokai High and Intermediate School. This year’s theme, “He Wa`a He Moku, He Moku He Wa`a; your canoe is like an island, an island is like your canoe,” is a testament to Kim’s mission to preserve Molokai’s natural and limited resources, according to event organizers.…

Nurturing `Olelo Hawaii

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Nurturing `Olelo Hawaii

Last Saturday was filled with keiki, mele, ono food, and `Olelo Hawaii—the Hawaiian language. Hundreds of Molokai residents congregated at Lanikeha in Ho`olehua, to celebrate the Hawaiian language and culture at Punana Leo O Molokai’s annual Ho’omau event.

Punana Leo O is a Hawaiian immersion preschool committed to reestablishing the native language,`olelo makuanhine, as the first language spoken at home. The school opened its doors in 1991, and now after 23 years, has served about 400 keiki ages three to five and ohana of Molokai.

“Today is to celebrate `Olelo Hawaii,” said event emcee Miki`ala Pescaia. “Our kupuna were [once] punished for speaking [the language].…

Descendants of Original Kalama`ula Homesteaders Sought

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Descendants of Original Kalama`ula Homesteaders Sought

DHHL News Release

The State of Hawaii Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) is seeking descendants still residing on Molokai of the 22 native Hawaiians allocated homestead lots and the 20 who were allocated residential lots at Kalaniana`ole Settlement, Kalama`ula, from Sept. 16, 1921, through Nov. 13, 1923.
In commemoration of the 90th anniversary of the Kalanana`ole Settlement at Kalama`ula and the original 42 Hawaiian homesteaders, DHHL is planning on a celebration at Kalaniana`ole Hall, Kalama`ula following the Hawaiian Homes Commission meeting at the DHHL offices at Kulana `Oiwi on April 21, where the families of the original homesteaders will be recognized.…

Lives Change at your Library

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Alu Like Native Hawaiian Library News Release

All types of libraries across the nation participate in National Library Week each April; we celebrate the contributions of our libraries, librarians, and promote library use and support. The Alu Like Native Hawaiian Library would like you to join our celebration of National Library Week on Monday, April 14 from 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, April 15 from 2 to 4 p.m., and on Wednesday, April 16 from 10 a.m. to noon for several workshops offered on the influence of economics within our everyday lives.

Workshop topics surround this year’s Library Week theme “Lives Change at your Library” and will include Hawaiian Historical Culture and Economics, Money Management and Preparing for our Future.…

The Importance of the ‘Aha Moku System

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Community Contributed

Opinion by members of the Kawela Moku

This represents individual mana`o from members of the Kawela Moku, and is not intended to speak for the Aha Kiole as a whole.

Hawaii Mowat on historical perspective

In the past century, the health of Hawaii’s ecosystem has severely declined. With the change of powers, came the change of the way we did things in Hawaii. Agriculture, development, invasive species, etc. has wreaked havoc on Hawaii’s natural resources and it seems as if the western way of land management does not work for Hawaii so the ancient yet sophisticated system must be revived.…

Celebrating Kuhio

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Celebrating Kuhio

The 4H Clover Lopers sold popcorn, cotton candy, and other items at the event for their future trip to Maui. Photos by Jessica Ahles

The Lanikeha Community Center transformed into a hearty birthday celebration as local vendors, music and entertainment attracted homesteaders and non-homesteaders alike to celebrate the man who led the 1921 Hawaiian Homes Act and the island where his efforts were first put into practice.

“Without the land, who are we?” said Colette Machado, Molokai chairperson of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA). “We would be homeless if we didn’t have a land base or homestead. That’s how significant Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana`ole was.”

Next in line for the throne when the Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown in 1894, Kuhio was elected as Hawaii’s congressional delegate, advocating for Hawaiian Homes and rehabilitating his people.…

Lessons in a Whale’s Belly

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Lessons in a Whale’s Belly

Captain Mark leads an imaginative journey around the island to a group of first and fourth graders. Photo by Jessica Ahles

Keiki had a whale of a time learning about humpback whales and their place in the environment Friday. But while most have only seen the great creatures from a distance, students at Kilohana School got up close and personal, climbing into the belly of a 36-foot inflatable humpback, softly rocking to soothing whale sounds and taking an imaginative ride around island’s waters.

“My name is Captain Mark and I’ll be your tour guide today,” Storybook Theater Executive Director Mark Jeffers said as he saluted to Kilohana School’s second grade class.…

Konane

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Konane

A Game Played, Value Won

Konane, similar to the game of checkers, is a traditional, strategic Hawaiian board game some say could last days. Photo by Jessica Ahles

“It’s your move!” said Hiwa Ritte, urging her opponent, Ko`i Davis, who was carefully peering over a finely-made koa konane board. “I’m thinking!”  Ko`i said, scratching her head, pondering which `ili `ele `ele, or black piece, to move in rows of alternating white and black stones.

Described as a test of strategy and intellect, the ancient Hawaiian game of konane, played by ali`i and commoners alike, was considered a favorite pastime to socialize and to even settle disputes, according to Kauai cultural practitioner Sean Chun.…