Author Archives: Dan Murphy

Capital Improvements Not Slowed By Economy

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Capital Improvements Not Slowed By Economy

State of Hawaii News Release Governor Linda Lingle announced last month that the State has advanced nearly $1.5 billion in capital improvement projects (CIP) statewide since her Administration launched a plan last December to accelerate public infrastructure construction as part of a comprehensive effort to stimulate the economy and create jobs.

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Molokai Duo Strums on Oahu

Monday, December 14th, 2009

Molokai Duo Strums on Oahu

Community Contributed
By Lucy Lamkin

Molokai ukulele maker Dan Ryerson and Ukes for Kids’ 13-year-old student Ace Villanueva participated in the eighth Annual Ukulele Guild of Hawaii Exhibition & Conference last month. On Nov. 21-22, the pair traveled to Oahu for the conference held at the Sheraton Hotel in Waikiki.


The event featured 48 instruments by 32 master builders. Builders from all over the world, including Hawaii, the mainland, New Zealand and Japan, gathered for two days to learn more about their craft. Ryerson put on his exhibit for the seventh year in a row. The event included instrument and craftsmanship displays, a program of workshops in instrument construction and playing techniques.

Ace Villanueva of Molokai performed in the lineup of well known players at the Conference Open Mic and was praised by world reknowned strummers Kalei Gamiao and Kimo Hussey. Gamiao, Hussey and several other recording artists inclduding Brittni Paiva, Daniel Nakashima and Chris Salvador played at the Saturday night banquet. 

Dan Ryerson’s Manae label has created custom ukuleles and guitars for clients in Hawaii, the mainland and Japan.  Ryerson initiated the Ukes For Kids program on Molokai that has supplied over 385 ukuleles to students like Villanueva across the island.

Molokai’s Ukes for Kids Program has received significant support from the The Ukulele Guild of Hawaii which is devoted to perpetuating Hawai‘i’s culture and heritage. Large contributions have come from as far away as Santa Cruz, California where guild member and instrument maker Dave Tachera produced a concert benefitting the Molokai program.  Local band Na Ohana Hoaloha has also consistently raised funds in support of the Ukes for Kids Program on Molokai.

A closer view of the Exhibition is available at: http://www.ukuleleguild.org/

The Upper Hand

Monday, December 14th, 2009

The Upper Hand



Photo Courtesy of Kevin Dudoit

Molokai junior Kevin Dudoit locks down his opponent from Mililani High School during the Maui Invitational Tournament at War Memorial Gym last Friday. Dudoit avenged a loss last year by winning the match and taking third place in the 135-pound weight class at the tournament. Koa Coupuz and Kailen Inouye also tooked home fourth-place awards in the 152 and 125-pound divisions and Kayla Pico was the Farmer’s top finisher with a 3rd place in the 98-pound divison. Twenty-one schools from all over the state competed in the annual tournament.

Farmers Finish Scoreless

Monday, December 14th, 2009

Farmers Finish ScorelessThe Molokai High girls’ soccer team failed to find the back of the net in a pair of games this weekend against Maui’s Kamehameha School. Kamehameha improved its record to 2-2 with a 7-0 Friday afternoon and a 5-0 win the following morning. Molokai dropped to 0-4 on the young season.

The Twilighters’ Dance

Monday, December 14th, 2009

The Twilighters’ Dance

The Big Stage

Monday, December 14th, 2009

The Big Stage


Tough green Astroturf, thousands of fans, a slew of opposing defenders and one league record were all left in the dust as Molokai running back Noah Caparida sped down the sideline at Honolulu’s Aloha Stadium last Sunday. Caparida weaved and juked his way to a 95-yard touchdown run – the longest in Island Youth Football League history – as the Farmers ran away with a convincing 32-6 win in their end-of-the-year bowl game.

“We ran a sweep to the outside and I just juked all of them out,” Caparida said. “It’s a good feeling [to set a record], it’s exciting.”

“It was a lot of fun I got to run over a couple of guys,” he said. “Every time we were getting close to the end zone I was running it up the middle.”

Traxler-Ortiz went out of his way to run over a few extra defenders on his first touchdown, a 15-yarder right up the middle.

“Overall, today they were the team that we were always looking to find throughout the season,” Kiaha said. “They played with heart and soul and passion for the game. Everybody had a great game.”

The Farmers finished their season with a 3-6 record, but turned some heads with their strong performance in the stadium this weekend. The trip, their second in as many years, was funded by generous donations from several local businesses and residents. The team went door-to-door on their furlough days to raise the money.

Library Furlough Schedule Released

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Library Furlough Schedule Released

It seems that no state department is immune from the wave of furloughs sweeping through Hawaii this year. Last week the public libraries announced that they, too, would be closing their doors in order to save money. Molokai’s public library has scheduled 15 furlough days between now and the end of May. The library will closed of the following dates:

December 16, 24, 31
January 13, 27
February 3, 10
March 5, 12, 19
April 7, 14, 21
May 5, 19

For more information contact Molokai branch manager Sri TenCate at (808) 553-1765.

The People of Molokai

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Community Contributed

The King of Roi

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

The King of Roi

Community Contributed

What started off as a senior project for Kumu Spencer-Misaki, soon became something much bigger and much more meaningful to him and to Molokai’s community. 

Kumu’s project was to address how to control the population of the peacock grouper fish, better known here in Hawai’i as roi.  It is an invasive species that was introduced to Hawaii in 1956 from French Polynesia as a food source.

However, it soon became apparent that the majority of the roi contained ciguatera a toxin that when consumed, can cause extreme sickness.  The roi also began eating a lot of Hawai’i’s reef fish.  A roi can consume 150 fish annually and its lifespan is approximately 13 years.  So in essence, one roi can consume 1950 fish in its lifetime.

Kumu took home two of the prizes for his own hard work. He won for the smallest fish (.17 lbs) and for the most caught by a team. He and his teammates Wilfred Spencer, John Borden, and Randy Cabreros brought in 64 fish, 31 of which were caught by Cabreros. Ehu Rawlins won the biggest catch of the day at 5.1 lbs.
All in all, the tournament brought in 392 roi in far from ideal conditions. Cameraman Cal Hirai said it was the most he had seen at any tournament this year.

After the prizes were awarded, Kumu presented Camie Kimball, Molokai High School Athletic Director, with a check for $1500.  Kumu also donated an additional $122 that he made by raffling a spear that was made by Eddie Castro.
Kumu decided to donate the money to the high school despite not playing any sports. He also has been working hard to raise funds for a school trip to Washington D.C. in March, but did not keep any of his hard-earned roi money for that trip. 

It was not just an individual who made all this happen, it was a community.  In these hard times, Molokai continues to do what we do best, support each other.  This was evident by the amount divers that came out in force that day, the businesses and individuals who so generously donated prizes, and the families that gave of their time and support.  Without all of them, this could not have been possible.

 

In Good Hands

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

In Good Hands

The waterfalls, lo`i and lush, green vegetation that cloak the Kawaikapu watershed on Molokai’s east end are here to stay. The Molokai Land Trust (MLT) purchased a 196.4 acre section of the sacred grounds last week.

The land’s previous owners, Greg and Tracy Gordon, sought to sell the property because it was becoming too much for them to handle. The 8.5 million square feet of land was being worn away by erosion, invasive species and animal damage.

“This land needed a better future and Molokai Land Trust offered a permanent solution by putting the land into conservation versus sold and developed,” Greg Gordon said.

Gordon originally turned to Ke Apuni Lokahi, a local community development non-profit organization, to help him find a safe owner for the land. They put Gordon in touch with MLT.

Last year, MLT took a major leap towards purchasing the land with a $767,976 grant from DLNR’s Legacy Lands Conservation Program.

“767,976 – that is a number I will not forget for as long as I live,” Haase said.

The County of Maui came through last month with the final piece of the puzzle – $480,000 through its Open Space, Natural Resources, Cultural Resources and Scenic Views Preservation fund. Last Monday, MLT officially gained ownership of the land from the Gordons.

“It’s our first land that we actually outright own,” Haase said. “Now, we actually have some tangible results, which is a very nice feeling.”

MLT was formed in 2006 to preserve and restore land on Molokai. Along with Kawaikapu, they currently hold 99-year leases on 1,695 acres of land on the island’s west end.